Stone and Symbol: The Stone in Jacob’s Dream, The “Stone of Destiny”

 

jacobs dream ancient

Jacob’s Dream” by Nicolas Dipre, 1495-1531.

The Dream of Jacob

Genesis 28:10-22

 

Jacob left Beersheba and set out for Harran.

 When he reached a certain place, he stopped for the night because the sun had set.

Taking one of the stones there, he put it under his head and lay down to sleep.

 He had a dream in which he saw a stairway resting on the earth, with its top reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. 

 There above it  stood the Lord, and he said: “I am the Lord, the God of your father Abraham and the God of Isaac.

I will give you and your descendants the land on which you are lying.

 Your descendants will be like the dust of the earth, and you will spread out to the west and to the east, to the north and to the south.

All peoples on earth will be blessed through you and your offspring.

I am with you and will watch over you wherever you go, and I will bring you back to this land.

I will not leave you until I have done what I have promised you.

 

The Stone of Scone… the Stone of Destiny… Lia Fail

 

(From The Encyclopedia Brittanica:)

 

The Stone of Scone, also called Stone of Destiny, Scottish Gaelic Lia Fail,a stone that for centuries was associated with the crowning of Scottish kings and then, in 1296, was taken to England and later placed under the Coronation Chair.

The stone, weighing 336 pounds (152 kg), is a rectangular block of pale yellow sandstone (almost certainly of Scottish origin) measuring 26 inches (66 cm) by 16 inches (41 cm) by 11 inches (28 cm). A Latin cross is its only decoration.

According to one Celtic legend, the stone was once the pillow upon which the patriarch Jacob rested at Bethel when he beheld the visions of angels.

From the Holy Land it purportedly traveled to Egypt, Sicily, and Spain and reached Ireland about 700 bce to be set upon the hill of Tara, where the ancient kings of Ireland were crowned.

Thence it was taken by the Celtic Scots who invaded and occupied Scotland.

About 840 ce it was taken by Kenneth MacAlpin to the village of Scone.

At Scone, historically, the stone came to be encased in the seat of a royal coronation chair.

John de Balliol was the last Scottish king crowned on it, in 1292, before Edward I of England invaded Scotland in 1296 and moved the stone (and other Scottish regalia) to London.

There, at Westminster Abbey in 1307, he had a special throne, called the Coronation Chair, built so that the stone fitted under it. This was to be a symbol that kings of England would be crowned as kings of Scotland also.

Attached to the stone in ancient times was allegedly a piece of metal with a prophecy that Sir Walter Scott translated as

Unless the fates be faulty grown
And prophet’s voice be vain
Where’er is found this sacred stone
The Scottish race shall reign.

When Queen Elizabeth I died without issue in 1603, she was succeeded by King James VI of Scotland, who became James I of England (or Great Britain).

James was crowned on the Stone of Scone, and patriotic Scots said that the legend had been fulfilled, for a Scotsman then ruled where the Stone of Scone was.

On Christmas morning 1950 the stone was stolen from Westminster Abbey by Scottish nationalists who took it back to Scotland.

Four months later it was recovered and restored to the abbey.

In 1996 the British government returned the stone to Scotland.

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