Stone Sanctuary, Chapter 3: Living on fractured schist

schist-cabin-stone-sanctuary-jungcurrents

 

 

In the hills above Fairbanks, the frostline goes down about four feet in the winter, so septic systems have to be buried more than four feet. a bit of a daunting task.

In researching how to replace an aging septic system last year, I learned that we live on “fractured schist.”

This geological underlayment is a continual poetic and philosophical delight.

Clearly, a stone mason’s task is to repair the fractures and get one’s schist together.

Or, to paraphrase Fraser Boa in the Way of the Dream, “The gold is in the schist.”

(The image is of the 8′ x 12′  cabin and roof garden at the Stone Sanctuary)

Next: Tetris, Stones and Trauma

Previous: Carl Jung — Often the Hands will Solve a Mystery

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